PhD Students

Meet Our Students

PBS is home to top-ranked Ph.D. students from around the world. Meet a few of the students conducting cutting-edge research in psychological and brain sciences. Check back often for new features and faces.

Youngki Hong - Social Psychology

Name: Youngki Hong

Hometown: Seoul, South Korea

Research Area: Social Psychology (SOC)

Research Specialty: Social Cognition, Intergroup Relations, Embodiment

I first moved to the United States in 2009 as a high school exchange student. My initial goal to learn English transformed into a love for the American culture and lifestyle—I didn’t want to leave! After moving to several different states in high school, I finally settled in as an undergraduate at the University of Minnesota, where I studied Psychology and Statistics. Since I was younger, I have always been fascinated by how people think and behave, which made my decision to study Psychology a no-brainer. Through my coursework I developed a strong interest in social psychology prompting me to pursue research opportunities. I worked in several labs studying topics in social cognition, perception, and health psychology. My research inspired me to develop my own projects related to social identity and prejudice. Delving into my thesis project made me realize how much there is to learn and inspired me to pursue an academic career in graduate school.

What is a typical day like for you?

My schedule varies each quarter, but I generally take classes, serve as a TA, conduct my own research projects, work out at the on-campus gym, and hangout on the beach. On weekends I spend time with friends (who are also in the PBS program) and catch up on unfinished assignments. Overall, my schedule is flexible, which makes it easier to manage all my schoolwork and research while maintaining my own social life.

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)?

As a college freshman, I attended a workshop on “how to apply for graduate school”, where I learned that professors want people who already behave like graduate students. Taking this advice, I started working as a research assistant my sophomore year, enrolled in graduate level courses, and pursued independent research opportunities. By the end of my senior year, I completed a couple of my own studies which helped me make a smooth transition into graduate school. In addition, I feel as though because of my training in Statistics, I am better able to understand and interpret not only my own research but also have insights for other people’s research, which is a critical skill set to have in graduate school.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Don’t be afraid to learn new things! In addition to doing what you love the most (conducting research), you will need to learn things that you may have not been exposed to before, such as programming, advanced statistics, and interdisciplinary research. It may seem intimidating at first, but once you get the hang of it, it can be as fun as doing research!

Why did you choose UCSB?

Most importantly, I chose UCSB because of my advisor, whose work and vision perfectly matched my own research interests. I also liked the collaborative environment in the department. There are plenty of opportunities for collaboration not just within areas but across different areas as well. Of course, I’d be lying if beautiful weather and close distance to the beach did not contribute to my decision to come to UCSB.

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

Having lived in Minnesota for four years, coming to Santa Barbara was a huge upgrade for me weather-wise. I like to go to the beach and spend time outside, and the weather is almost always perfect for that. There are also plenty of opportunities for fun in Santa Barbara; a few things I have tried so far include yoga, kickboxing, rock climbing, and wine tasting! In my spare time, I like to work out, watch TV shows and sports, cook, or just hang out with friends.

What are your future plans?

If the opportunities are given, I hope to stay in academia and become an academic researcher/professor in the US. However, the future is full of uncertainties, and I try to live in the moment for now.

Yi-Wen Wang - Cognition, Perception, Cognitive Neuroscience

Name: Yi-Wen Wang

Hometown: Taipei, Taiwan

Research Area: Cognition, Perception, Cognitive Neuroscience (CPCN)

Research Specialty: Perceptual Category Learning; Memory Systems in the Brain

I received my BSc and MSc degrees in Computer Science from National Taiwan University (NTU), and then worked as a programmer for more than 3 years. While writing programs was fun, I could not get a sense of meaning from the products that I was working on. I love reading, so I switched to the publishing industry, and eventually became a freelance translator. It was a meaningful job for me because I could help people in Taiwan get access to information from around the world. But as time went by, I realized that being a translator limited me in the sense that I had very little to no input into the accuracy of the information that I was helping to put out. That was when I decided to pursue a PhD degree.

So the next question was which field to devote myself to. I’ve observed that in society in general there is a high demand for greater knowledge about how our brains work. And yet, I’ve also noticed that there is a lack of knowledge in this field. Thus, I feel that the field of brain science needs more researchers to fill this need in our daily lives. And that led me to audit some courses in the psychology department and medical school, and it was real eye opening experience for me. I found out how scientists are now able to use new technologies to study the neural activities in human brains, and I realized the programming skills that I have could be a powerful tool in this field. Thus, I went back to NTU and earned my second MSc degree in Psychology, and made sure that this was what I wanted to do. Then I applied to UCSB because I wanted to be involved in the intriguing studies people are doing here.

What is a typical day like for you?

I am a night owl, so I do most of the work that requires clear thinking at night, such as writing, designing new studies and data analysis. During the day, I go to classes, talks, meetings (with my advisor, the lab members, or my research assistants) and run studies.

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)?

It might not sound straightforward but I think the programming skills and the mathematical training that I got from my computer science background are of great help. As a scientist, a great portion of our work is spent on designing studies for testing our hypothesis and working with data. In our lab, we run studies on computers, and my programming skills provide me more freedom in writing codes for new studies. In addition, thinking about how the human brain might work similarly to or differently from a computer often provides an interesting point of reference and questions from unexpected angles. And the mathematical training is certainly important for examining the data from several different aspects and making sense of them.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

There are two things that I keep reminding myself and would like to share here. The first is to make every effort to speak up. Share what you do whenever you get a chance, and don’t hesitate to ask when you need help or new ideas. For an introverted person like me, it really takes effort to do that, and the fact that English is my second language and that the culture in Taiwan emphasizes modesty are certainly not helping. But I noticed that people feel more comfortable when they get a chance to know more about me, and they are glad when you approach them. Most people here are nice and supportive, thus this is a perfect environment to get more comfortable speaking up in a group.

A second thing to keep in mind is to not define your success by whether or not you’re better than others. We all come here by passing all the strict selection processes, so some of us might get into a habit of comparing ourselves with others. But when you focus on doing good research instead of trying to compete with your colleagues, someone who you might have considered a potential competitor might, in turn, become someone who helps you learn and progress faster. And you can have more fun in doing research when you are able to focus on and appreciate the discoveries that you helped to make.

Why did you choose UCSB?

It is because of my advisor, Dr. Ashby. I found out about his work when I was taking a neural modeling course in Taiwan. I wrote to him and asked questions that I got when I was trying to replicate modeling results in one of his articles, and he offered much help and was very open-minded. Our interview during the recruitment week confirmed for me that he is a scientist with very clear explanations of his ideas, solid knowledge in math and neuroscience, as well as the best personality that you can expect from a mentor. I also found that his research is all about building models based on evidence from empirical data, cell recordings in animals and fMRI in humans, which from my point of view will play a key role in furthering our understanding of how our brains really work.

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

Number one is the perfect weather! Unlike my home, Taiwan, you never have to worry that a storm or typhoon (it’s like a hurricane) might affect your studies in any way. In addition to that, Santa Barbara is a charming town with almost every convenience of a city.

In my spare time, I love watching wildlife, especially birds – there are so many kinds, and most of them I have never seen in my home town. I bought a pair of compact binoculars and it turned out to be a great investment in my daily fun. I enjoy watching them on a nearby trail, on campus, and even at home through the window! I even found a nail under my roof that once in a while you will find a black phoebe sleeping on.

A bonus tip – if you love going to the symphony, don’t forget to sign up for MUSIC 1. The course is offered each quarter, and you will get a free ticket for an orchestral performance at the Granada Theatre. The only thing you have to do for a pass is to attend the concert and write a short essay. The seat might not be perfectly close, and that is when your binoculars will really come in handy!

What are your future plans?

Keep doing research, whether in academia, in a company, or on my own.

Kasie Mays - Neuroscience and Behavior

Name: Kasie Mays

Hometown: Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Research Specialty: Neuroscience and Behavior

I first became interested in psychology in high school when I decided to take a psychology course as an elective. I enjoyed learning more about the human condition and understanding not only how, but why people behave the way they do. After this course, I decided to pursue a degree in psychology and obtained my B.S in psychology with a minor in biology from the University of South Dakota. It was during this time that I took a course in biopsychology and discovered the name for what I loved most about psychology—learning about the brain. The brain is an amazing and unbelievably powerful organ and I would argue that it is our most important organ since it is the only one that cannot be replaced. It holds everything you know, and it makes you who you are. 

I am also a single-mother to two outstanding boys, so for any mothers out there that are reading this—YOU CAN DO IT!

What is a typical day like for you?

What I enjoy the most about this program is that there really isn’t a “typical” day. My days consist of anything from pipetting and making solutions in lab, to working with mice (whether that’s genotyping pups, performing surgeries, or completing dissections), to even working with highly advanced microscope systems to obtain images of brain tissues. We are constantly learning and doing new things—and that keeps graduate school life exciting (and busy).

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

I would say what best prepared me for a PhD in Psychology was by obtaining as many research experiences as I could. Psychology is a huge overarching term that has many different sub-divisions that are all pretty unique. I did not want to decide which one I wanted to do until I had experience conducting each type of research. Therefore, as an undergrad, I worked in laboratories that focused in cognitive neuroscience, behavioral neuroscience, social neuroscience and qualitative research regarding child and adolescent well-being.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Get involved as much as you possibly can! That can mean different things for different people. It could mean making sure you read a ton of articles and ask a lot of questions so you are deeply involved in your research, or it could mean getting involved with the department level or campus level organizations.  Then balance this involvement with making sure to schedule time each week to do things that you love to do, I can guarantee if you don’t make sure to do this, you will burn out. Your research is important, but so are you!

Why did you choose UCSB?

I chose UCSB for a few reasons. The biggest deciding factor was my advisor, I first applied to be on Dr. Janusonis’ research team because I found his research incredibly interesting, but what sealed the deal was that we got along really well when we did meet. It’s impossible to have an advisor that you get along with all the time, but trust me, your life will be much less stressful if you take your time to find an advisor that is researching something you are interested in and that you have a healthy working relationship with. 

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

Santa Barbara is beautiful and let’s be honest—you really can’t beat the weather here. Plus, where else are you going to find both mountains and the ocean? In my spare time, I spend as much time as I can doing activities with my two children. We try to spend as much time as we can outside (there are a lot of great beaches and hikes near-by). Then I also try to make time for things I love such as crocheting, doing Zumba, and swimming at the rec center.  

What are your future plans?

My plans for the future are still developing, but ideally, I would like to continue to conduct research—possibly in the private sector. However, something wonderful that this program offers is the ability to obtain different emphases, specializations and certificates that can help you in the future! To increase my employability in the future, I decided to also obtain my certificate in college and university teaching (CCUT). 
 

Katy Walter - Developmental and Evolutionary Psychology

Name: Katy Walter

Hometown: Lafayette, California

Research Specialty: mate preferences, mate choice, sex differences

For undergrad, I went to a small liberal arts school, Vassar College, in New York. I majored in Science, Technology, and Society, a multidisciplinary study of the way that science works and interacts with the people and tools around it. The curriculum exposed me to a variety of fields, including psychology, physics, economics, and alternative energy technology. However, after taking a course in social psychology alongside a course about bio-social controversies, I became very interested in how people study sex differences and human mating, and the perspectives of evolutionary psychologists. This interest led me to write my senior thesis about the controversies surrounding research on sex differences. After finishing my senior thesis, I realized that I was not content to just critique the findings of others. I wanted to contribute, and therefore decided to pursue a PhD in psychology.

What is a typical day like for you?

Each day is different and a graduate student wears many hats. We are, at the same time, researchers, students, teachers, mentors, and mentees, all of which is incredibly rewarding but makes for a busy schedule!  I try to spend as much time as I can on research, but also spend a lot of time helping students and RAs, and prepping for and participating in lab meetings and class.  If possible, I try to keep my mornings free to work on research and then schedule any meetings and tackle other work in the afternoon. I also try to schedule an exercise class in the evening after work to de-stress. 

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

Writing a senior thesis! Completing a long-term and largely independent project in an area that I was extremely passionate about was a great way to prepare for graduate school.  Research takes a long time so being able to work on something for an entire year in undergrad and create an original piece of work was good practice for graduate school. Additionally, getting some experience as a research assistant was helpful. I wasn’t a psychology major so I ended up volunteering as an RA in a couple labs during my two gap years in between undergrad and graduate school. I found that I loved my RA tasks: sorting through open-ended data sets and working on lit reviews. My enthusiasm for my RA work solidified my ambition to pursue a career in psychology research, and helped reaffirm my interest in human mating. 

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Make sure you are passionate about the area you are studying. I realized after undergrad that there were unanswered questions in human mating psychology that I believe I would be happy working on answering for the rest of my life. Graduate school is filled with challenges, rejections, and long-stretches without feedback so intrinsic motivation is extremely important. Along the same lines, I believe a PhD is a perseverance degree. 

Why did you choose UCSB?

First, UCSB is a great place to study evolutionary psychology! We have so many amazing faculty and graduate students here who study the mind from an evolutionary perspective. Second, my advisor Dr. Dan Conroy-Beam is fantastic and we have a lot of overlapping research interests.  Lastly, the psychology department at UCSB has a really collaborative atmosphere and people tend to have, or at least try to have, work-life balance. 

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

I can walk from lab and be looking out over the ocean in about 2 minutes- this is still crazy to me! In my spare time I love hanging out with friends and family, exploring all the nearby towns, wine and beer tasting, and working out.  

What are your future plans?

I hope to be a professor someday, but remain open to whether this will be at a large university or small college. 
 

Delancey Wu - Social Psychology

Name: Delancey Wu

Hometown: Rockville, MD

Research Specialty: Close relationships, culture, nonverbal communication 

I went to Carnegie Mellon University for my undergrad as a Psychology major. To be honest, I picked my major without knowing much about what psychology was about, but it turns out I picked the right major! I really liked social psychology because it was cool how you can study human behavior and abstract concepts, like trusting a romantic partner, in a quantitative, scientific manner. Moreover, it was fun learning how current behaviors and feelings can be associated with changes in longitudinal outcomes, such as relationship quality and health. After learning about social psychology in a class setting, I wanted the chance to participate in the research process myself! I joined a lab researching close relationships, and now as a PhD candidate, I am building upon the work I helped with in undergrad.

What is a typical day like for you?

Feed and walk my dog, go to campus to work on research or go to class, walk and feed my dog again, finish up any last-minute work at home, and then wind down the day by watching YouTube videos and playing video games.

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

I was lucky that I was able to find a lab I loved relatively early in my undergrad and stayed with them until I graduated. Working in a lab for three years in undergraduate gave me ample time to develop basic research skills, explore what I want to study, and ask other graduate students and faculty what the research life is like. 

Also, being able to do an honors thesis in my senior year tremendously helped with deciding to get a PhD. Going through the process of completing an honors thesis was really the only opportunity I had to experience what it’s like to run a study from beginning to end, before deciding to devote 5+ years to graduate school. I highly recommend those interested in graduate school to either do an honors thesis or be part of a similar project in order to understand the ins and outs of research.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Take graduate school seriously but also have fun with it. Picking research topics you are genuinely interested in will help you stay motivated and keep up with the workload. There are definitely times in graduate school where the work is overwhelming, so working on ideas you care about can make that work more manageable.

Why did you choose UCSB?

The obvious answer is the beach environment, but the real answer is because of the chance to work with my amazing advisor, Dr. Nancy Collins. Nancy is the perfect combination of thoughtful feedback and positivity. It’s an understatement to say that Nancy is an expert in the field we work in, so she always provides valuable feedback for how to improve my projects. At the same time, she delivers her comments in the most positive and self-affirming way possible. If I ever need a pick-me-up, I reach out to Nancy :)

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

Santa Barbara is a really good place to be able to do work in a relaxing environment, so if I ever need a break, 99% of the time I can just walk outside to recharge myself. If I’m free to explore Santa Barbara, I like going to the local coffeeshops (I recommend Dune Coffee Roasters, Handlebar, Caje, and Old Town Coffee) and finding a new hiking trail or a dog park to take my dog out to play.

What are your future plans?

The current plan is to get either a research-focused or a teaching-focused position in academia. So far in my time at graduate school, I’ve learned that I like both conducting research as well as teaching psychology to students, so as of now, I would be pretty satisfied if I get either kind of position.
 

Alyssa Lawson - Cognition, Perception, Cognitive Neuroscience

Name: Alyssa Lawson

Hometown: Santa Barbara, CA

Research Specialty: The cognition of learning and instruction

I started in psychology because I thought that I wanted to go into forensic psychology. Because of this, I began a B.A. in Psychology at Chapman University. Very quickly after starting, I realized that crime was not something I wanted to be surrounded by for the rest of my life, so I started exploring other options. While at Chapman, I was involved with a few different labs that led me to my interest in understanding learning from a cognitive perspective. Specifically, I worked in a lab that investigated how having students create causal connections while learning influenced their performance on posttests. After graduating with my B.A., I moved to California State University, Los Angeles to earn my M.A. in Psychology. At CSULA, my interest in the intersection between educational psychology and cognitive psychology grew. In a lab there, I researched how people’s understanding of math influenced how they solve math problems. I am now continuing my journey into cognitive and educational psychology and developing new projects to help people learn better. 

What is a typical day like for you?

As a second year, my typical day is pretty hectic, but I still enjoy it. I split my time between attending classes, working on homework, running participants for my studies, writing about my studies, meeting with various people, keeping up with all the emails I get throughout the day, TAing, and working on developing new study ideas.

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

What prepared me most for being in a PhD program in psychology was the research experience that I got from both from my undergraduate and Master’s schooling. I graduated a year early from my undergraduate university, so I didn’t have much time to work on research and develop research ideas, so it was beneficial to me to continue into a Master’s program. Having a basis for how to conduct research from the very beginning (the conceptualization of a research idea) to the very end (writing up and submitting the manuscript to journals) was very helpful in preparing me for this program. Also, by working in different labs while in school, I figured out how to balance work, school, and research. That was super helpful going into this program.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

I would tell anyone going into a PhD program to make sure that you love what you are doing. Working on a PhD is a lot of work and can be very overwhelming, but if you love research and the area you are doing research in, you will be able to more easily get past any obstacles that comes up. 

Why did you choose UCSB?

I chose to attend UCSB because my research interests matched well with the research of my advisor, Dr. Richard Mayer and working with Dr. Mayer was a huge opportunity that I couldn’t pass up. I also chose Santa Barbara because I am from here and wanted to come back to the beautiful beach town I grew up in.

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

Like I said, Santa Barbara is my home, so I love that I get to work on my PhD in a place that is familiar. Even so, working on a PhD here is such a different experience than growing up here. Many of the places that people in the program go to are places I had absolutely no idea about while growing up! In my limited spare time, I like to walk my dog on some of the many trails SB has to offer. 

What are your future plans?

I’m still figuring it out. I definitely would like to keep doing research in my interest area, and I think I would like to stay in academia. But, I am open to whatever is out there.

Rammy Salem - Social Psychology

Name: Rammy Salem

Hometown: Bayonne, NJ

Research Specialty: Intergroup Relations and Social Identity

After graduating from Cornell University, I tried out different career paths, and I kept in touch with my intro psychology professor, Dr. James Maas. He told me about an opportunity to become a teaching assist for the intro psych course at Cornell’s branch campus in Qatar. That experience planted the seed in my head to consider pursuing graduate studies in psychology. I investigated the different areas within psychology, and contacted some professionals in the different fields to get a better sense of which area I would enjoy the most, and came to the conclusion that social psychology was the best fit. 

What is a typical day like for you?

Most days consist of some combination of classes and meetings. I enjoy learning with and from others, and sharing my thoughts and ideas as well. This iterative exchange of ideas, whether with undergraduate students, fellow graduate students, or faculty, is what makes most days interesting. 

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

Although I did not major in psychology as an undergraduate, I served as an undergraduate teaching assistant for the introductory psychology course at Cornell, and did some psychology research on perceptions of subliminal visual stimuli. In order to better prepare myself for graduate school, I enrolled in the post-baccalaureate program in Psychology and Social Behavior at UC Irvine, in which I took core psychology courses and obtained much-needed research experience.  

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Keep a list of ideas with you somewhere, whether you prefer to jot it down in a notebook or store it digitally on your computer or phone. While reading journal articles can be a good source of finding gaps in the literature, you can also derive inspiration from your daily activities as well, such as watching television, sitting in a coffee shop, or even standing in line at the DMV. 

Why did you choose UCSB?

While I was completing my post-baccalaureate program at UC Irvine, Professor David Sherman was invited to give a talk, and I thought that he and his research were very interesting. After researching UCSB, I found that there were a number of other prominent faculty members in the social psychology area like Drs. Diane Mackie and Brenda Major that were researching interesting subject matter. During my interviews, I got a sense that I would be able to research topics that were important to me, and I also discovered that a few other graduate students and professors at the time also happened to be Cornell alumni, so I figured that if they like it here, I probably will too. The scenic location was also a nice perk.   

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

I like the freedom of being able to explore topics that I find interesting, and the autonomy to pursue them. I think Santa Barbara has quite an eclectic range of dining options for a city of its size, so I like to try out different restaurants with my wife.  

What are your future plans?

I would like to work in a university or other research-oriented organization, but I am open to whatever the future has in store for me.
 

Tadeg Quillien - Developmental and Evolutionary Psychology

Name: Tadeg Quillien

Hometown: Lyon (France)

Research Specialty: Evolutionary Psychology

I grew up and spent most of my life in France, though I also did an exchange year in Belfast, Northern Ireland; I moved to the United states in 2015 to start my PhD. One of my majors in college was philosophy, and I was fascinated by philosophy of mind. I soon discovered that many questions about the mind which were previously the domain of philosophers were starting to open up to empirical investigation, and I wanted to be a part of that, so I started studying psychology.

What is a typical day like for you?

One of the best parts of being a graduate student is that our activities are very diverse. On a given day I may get to teach, attend talks, program an experiment, analyze data, read articles, work on a manuscript, etc. A lot of my work is theoretical, so I also spend a fair bit of my time solving equations and writing computer simulations.

What best prepared you for a PhD in Psychology? What did you do in your undergraduate career that prepared you to be a PhD student (lab work, teaching, research)? 

I like to think that my training in philosophy helped with identifying interesting research questions. Psychology is still a young field, and we still don’t really have a clear sense of which questions are even relevant to understanding how the mind works.

I also did a Master in cognitive science prior to coming to UCSB, in the course of which I worked as a research assistant in various labs. These were fun experiences, and very useful for getting a sense of what it is like to do research in psychology.

What advice do you have for incoming students?

Learn how to use the statistical software R, and especially the tidyverse package. It has a steep learning curve but will pay up in the long run: you will be much more efficient when organizing your data, and will be able to ask more interesting questions about it.

Take classes outside your immediate research interests, or even outside your department. It’s easy to forget how fun it is to learn new things when you spend all your time focusing on a narrow subfield! 

Why did you choose UCSB?

Ever since I can remember I have been fascinated by evolutionary biology; knowing how natural selection works is very useful in understanding the human mind. UCSB has one of the best programs in the world in evolutionary psychology, so it seemed like the best place to be at.

What do you like about getting your PhD in Santa Barbara? What do you do in Santa Barbara in your (precious) spare time?

I like to attend concerts at venues like the Santa Barbara Bowl or the Granada Theater (Santa Barbara has a surprisingly good cultural scene for such a small city), hike in the mountains, take a run along the beach…